Dropbox Adopts AMD EPYC Single Socket Platform To Support Future Growth

Dropbox, with its 500 million users and its 300,000 business customers, becomes the latest in a long list of companies to consider AMD ‘s unique socket EPYC platform to support its future growth and update its infrastructure to meet the workloads of the company.

According to one blog article by Scott AylorDropbox will use the AMD EPYC 7351P socket servers to “support future growth beyond its current capabilities and refresh its existing infrastructure for its most demanding compute workloads.”

The EPYC 7351P processor is a 16-core/32-wire processor with a base speed of 2.5 GHz and an amplification frequency of 2.9 GHz, and a TDP range of 155 to 170 W.

Each EPYC processor can Supports up to 2TB of DDR4 RAM over eight channels, and has 128 lines PCIe means that the platform has more than two and a half times the density of I/O of a processor such as Intel Xeon SP Series.

“AMD EPYC is a compelling processing option for our computing technology, providing Dropbox with the technical specifications needed to support the workloads of teams and our users,” said Rami Aljamal, Head of Hardware Engineering. and the Dropbox supply chain. “We are excited to deploy EPYC processors and look forward to working closely with AMD in the future.”

  • EPYC, launched in June 2017, had an extremely disturbing list of features:
  • Up to 32 “Zen” high-performance cores
  • Single and dual socket support
  • Eight DDR4 channels per CPU
  • Up to 2TB of RAM per CPU
  • Infinity Fabric for interconnections between matrices and matrices
  • 128 PCIe channels
  • Dedicated security subsystem, including Secure Memory Encryption (SME) specifically designed to protect virtual machines and containers from each other
  • Integrated Chipset
  • Compatible with new generation EPYC Processors

Processors prices range from $400 to more than $2,000 per chip.

One of the truly revolutionary aspects of the EPYC was its unique socket capability. And not just a single socket, but what AMD has called “the industry’s first uncompromising one-socket solutions”.

Before EPYC, if you were looking for a complete and powerful server in a single socket configuration, you were out of luck.

In the last twelve months, EPYC has seen a lot of wins in the server sector, both among server partners such as Dell and HPE, and companies looking to take advantage of new silicon, companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo Japan, Package, Baidu, whitefish, and Cray.

Compsmag