HTC U Ultra Review

HTC U Ultra Review

The HTC U Ultra is more than just another oversized smartphone. It's the first proper flagship phone of 2017, one of the first noteworthy "phablets" to see the light ...

HTC U Ultra Review: It’s no mystery that HTC has had a tough go of it for the previous few years, despite providing solid flagship devices renowned for their lovely design, build quality and incredible audio experience. With that mentioned, it, unfortunately, has been a case of “more of the identical” when it proceeds to the company’s flagships, which is one of the causes for their lackluster efficiency in the market.

Now, last year’s HTC 10 did make a lovely design and a few neat features to the table. However, the phone was ultimately more of an evolution than a revolution.

Specification

Display Size: 5.7 inches

OS: Android OS, v7.0 (Nougat)

Chipset: Qualcomm MSM8996 Snapdragon 821

Internal Storage: 64/128 GB

RAM: 4 GB RAM

Rear Camera: 12MP

Front Camera: 16MP

Battery Life: Non-removable Li-Ion 3000 mAh battery

Design

HTC U Ultra

The HTC is a company that prides itself on design, and it’s flagship metal One-series smartphones have, in my opinion, always been lovely devices. That’s why I’m a little dissatisfied by the U Ultra, which feels just like the ugly duckling of HTC’s line.

HTC’s ditched the full-metal body design it were famous for and opted for a glass back. This would be nice if the glass had the stylish feel of that on the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge. However, it doesn’t.

Display

HTC U Ultra

The U Ultra has a 5.7-inch display, Tremendous LCD5 panel, and it’s easily one of the phone’s strongest assets. Sure, there are brighter screens on the market — LG’s G6 and last year’s Galaxy S7s come to mind — however, the U Ultra’s panel nonetheless provides glorious viewing angles and decent colors.

Software

HTC U Ultra

The HTC U Ultra’s software is one of its best strengths. The handset runs using Android Nougat and HTC’s nifty Sense skin. One of the best of these involves developed battery-saving ‘Doze’ powers, better multi-process help and a developed UI and notifications system.

Hardware and Performance

HTC U Ultra

64 GB and 128 GB are the in-built storage options available with the HTC U Ultra, however, if it is a concern, you do get expandable storage via microSD card as much as an additional 256 GB. However, maintain in mind that in markets where the dual-SIM variant of the phone is available, users will have to perform the selection between dual-SIM capabilities and expandable storage, with the secondary SIM slot increasing as the microSD card slot.

Beneath the hood, the HTC U Ultra comes with a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 processor, 4 GB of RAM. This is the processing package of selection for most current generation flagships, together with the LG G6. Actual world performance of the U Extremely doesn’t maintain any surprises.

Camera

HTC U Ultra

You get a 12 MP “UltraPixel” rear camera with a massive 1.55-micron pixel size. The front-facing 16 MP shooter is no slouch either and can take glorious selfies. The camera is quick to launch, snap photos, fast to focus and the photos it takes are quite good. The photo quality is on par with the camera of the Google Pixel, and just like the latter, the U Ultra camera shoots with HDR mode enabled by default. The photos are clear and crisp, color reproduction is pleasant, and it does quite well with handling exposure even in high contrast situations.

Battery Life

HTC U Ultra

Battery life is one other space the HTC U Ultra falls flat. Despite this being a large phone, HTC’s only loaded it with a 3000mAh battery, which simply isn’t massive sufficient for a phablet – even with Android Nougat’s vast array of power-saving features.

Connectivity Options

WLAN: dual-band, WiFi Direct, Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, DLNA, hotspot

Bluetooth: v4.2, A2DP, LE

NFC: Yes

GPS: Yes, with A-GPS, GLONASS, BDS

Sensors: Fingerprint (front-mounted), accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass

Conclusion

HTC U Ultra

The phone comes with high-end specs, eye-catching design, and a stable camera. However, the small battery and the lack of a headphone jack are questionable choices at best. It’s also lacking features that are becoming increasingly standard, like wireless charging and dust/water resistance. That would all be fantastic if not for the $750 price tag that’s extremely hard to justify and makes the phone far less accessible to consumers. It’s a price level that only diehard HTC followers would be willing to bear, and while this may be the phone for U, it certainly isn’t the one for me.

Where To Buy


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