Lenovo Yoga Book (Windows Version) Review

Lenovo recently launched an all new convertible 2-in-1 laptop, the Lenovo Yoga Book, which is undoubtedly one of the vital thrillings of 2016. Being a mid-ranged 2-in-1, the Lenovo Yoga Book is meant for writers, journalists or an artist. The 0.38-inch thick convertible 2-in-1 collects all your pen strokes on its 10-inch screen via company’s all-new Create Pad, which is the first-of-its-kind haptic keyboard. The Lenovo Yoga Book grosses from $549 for Home windows and $499 for Android. In this evaluation, we will discuss the Yoga Book with Windows in depth.

Lenovo Yoga Book 10.1" Windows Tablet - Full HD Drawing 2 in 1 Tablet (Intel Atom, 4GB RAM, 64GB SSD, Windows), Black, ZA150000US

$549.99

Lenovo Yoga Book (Windows Version) Review

Lenovo Yoga Book -Specifications

ProcessorIntel Atom x5-Z8550 processor clocked at 2.4 GHz
RAM4 GB
Storage64 GB SSD
Display10.1-inch Full-HD (1080p)
Operating SystemWindows 10 Home
GraphicsIntel HD 400
Dimensions10.1 x 6.7 x 0.38 inches/ 1.5 pounds

 

Design

 

Lenovo Yoga Book

Yoga Book looks like an expensive notebook when closed. The black magnesium-aluminum body is silky to touch with just a hint of graininess. A shiny chrome Lenovo logo is embedded in the bottom left corner pf the notebook, and the Lenovo’s signature silvery aluminum watchband hinge is present at the lower part to convert the notebook into tablet or tent mode, just like other Yoga laptops. Open the laptop, and you will find a black panel that will serve as your writing and typing space.

Lenovo Yoga Book

Lenovo Yoga Book

An 8 MP camera is located at the top right corner of the deck, while the 2 MP front camera is located at the top thick bezel of the Yoga Book’s display. Talking about the ports, Lenovo managed to squeeze a micro HDMI, microSD card slot and a micro-USB port on the left corner of Yoga Book. While the power and volume buttons are placed on the right with a combined headphone/microphone jack.

Keyboard and Touchpad

Believe it or not, but the keyboard on the Lenovo Yoga Book is not meant for those who need to type a lot. Being a touch sensitive keyboard, it becomes tough to type quickly on this keyboard. Despite the haptic feedback that vibrates the entire keyboard when you press a key, the lack of any proper physical feedback makes the typing tough.

Lenovo Yoga Book

Coming to the 2.6 x 1.3-inch touchpad, as the scale itself suggests, the touchpad is subtle and is a nightmare for the users with big palm. The absence of physical mouse buttons makes the touchpad even worse. Thanks to the two side margins which performed their right and left mouse button duties well.

Display

Lenovo Yoga Book

The Lenovo Yoga Book comes with a 10.1-inch Full-HD (1080 x 1920 pixels resolution) display which is impressively colorful and bright. With the maximum brightness of 343 nits, the Yoga Book’s display manages to perform well in both low and bright light conditions. Color reproduction is quite impressive. The only place where the display lacked is the color accuracy. Vibrant colors may appear dull, while the dark colors may appear darker than the usual.

Real Pen and Create Pad

Lenovo Yoga Book

The typing experience on the Yoga Book was bit awkward. However, to make the Yoga Book exciting, Lenovo introduced a Create Pad. The purpose of Create Pad is that it converts the analog creations into a digital format. The integrated digitizer in the Create Pad supports as much as 2,048 levels of pressure sensitivity with a 100-degree angle detection. You need to press the pen icon located next to the camera on the keyboard deck to activate the Create Pad.

Lenovo Yoga Book

Now, to draw or write or sketch on this Pad, Lenovo includes a Real Pen that can transform from Stylus to an actual ballpoint pen, just in case if you need a real pen. To change from stylus to pen, you can slide one of the three mini ballpoint tips into the hole at the top of the pen.

Graphics and Audio

The Yoga Book comes with preinstalled Intel HD 400 Graphics GPU which is suitable for moderate gaming, but not more than that.

Lenovo Yoga Book

For such a thin chassis, the Yoga Book is surprisingly loud. Not only that, the audio is surprisingly clear, as I found listening to Chris Stapleton’s “Tennessee Whiskey.” The singer’s smoky vocals meshed with the light strumming of the acoustic and bass guitars. The Dolby Audio software program undoubtedly made for the best listening experience. Among all the six settings (Dynamic, Movie, Music, Sport, Voice, and Personalize), Dynamic delivered the perfect audio overall.

Hardware and Performance

Lenovo Yoga Book

The Lenovo Yoga Book is powered by Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processor clocked at 2.4 GHz that comes with 4GB of RAM isn’t going to set the world on fire. It can, however, will let you take some notes, draw a sketch or two, or watch a movie. The notebook does not show any lag, even with eight tabs of Google Chrome running in the background while streaming a Full-HD video on YouTube.

The Yoga Book’s 64 GB eMMC flash drive (expandable to 128 GB via micro-SD card) reproduced 4.97GB of mixed files in just 2 minutes and 57 seconds. That’s a transfer charge of 28.8 Mbps, which is very well better than the Dell’s Inspiron 11 3000’s 27.2 Mbps. However, the Miix 310, which has a 64GB eMMC drive, delivered 36.7 Mbps, whereas the Microsoft’s Surface 3 (128GB eMMC drive) delivered 36.7 MBps.

Lenovo Yoga Book

It doesn’t matter what we threw at it; the Yoga Book remained cool under urgent. After streaming a Full-HD YouTube video for 15 minutes, the Yoga Book’s touchpad and space between the G and H keys measured 82 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. The underside of the convertible was a tad hotter at 96 degrees, which is only barely above our 95-degree consolation threshold.

Battery Life

Lenovo Yoga Book

According to Lenovo, the Yoga Book can last as long as 13 hours on a charge. However, once we ran our battery test, which consists of regular internet browsing over Wi-Fi, the notebook lasted 9 hours and 35 minutes. That inevitably outlasts the Surface 3’s 8 hours and the Inspiron 11 3000’s  5 hours and 30 minutes. However, The Miix 310 was the best amongst all the convertible, with 12 hours and 24 minutes.

Configuration Option

The Windows version of the Yoga Book costs $549 and features 2.4-GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processor with 4GB RAM, a 64 GB eMMC flash drive and an Intel HD 400 Graphics GPU. The Android version of the Yoga Book has the identical specs and costs $499.

Conclusion

 

Lenovo Yoga Book

The Yoga Book is the futuristic convertible that we need somewhere down the line. Lenovo undoubtedly will get factors for taking a risk and creating such a daring product. The Yoga Book’s superthin, superlight chassis is the factor desires are manufactured from, whereas the Halo keyboard is straight out of a science fiction novel. The Create Pad offers you a realistic pen feel. However, as revolutionary as the keyboard is, it makes using the convertible as a laptop pretty tough. It also would have been good if the Windows version of the Yoga Book allow you to take notes with the screen off, just like the Android model.

Where To Buy

Lenovo Yoga Book 10.1" Windows Tablet - Full HD Drawing 2 in 1 Tablet (Intel Atom, 4GB RAM, 64GB SSD, Windows), Black, ZA150000US

$549.99

Lenovo Yoga Book (Windows Version) Review

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source: www.laptopmag.com

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