‘Fingerprint’ for 3D printers Can Aid In Protecting Intellectual property

‘Fingerprint’ for 3D printers Can Aid In Protecting Intellectual property

3D printing is transforming everything from fashion and health care to transportation and toys. But this rapidly evolving technology, also known as additive manufacturing, can threaten national security and intellectual property rights.

Researchers in the US have developed a method to track the origin of 3D-printed items by identifying machines by their unique ‘hot end’, reducing the risk of 3D-printer users tampering with national security and intellectual property.

To reduce the illicit use of 3D printers, Zhanpeng Jin, an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University at Buffalo, is developing a way to track the origin of 3D-printed items.

Jin’s concern was that, as long as people have the digital design for an item – which can be downloaded from the internet, sometimes as open-source material – they can print out anything they want, ranging from computer parts and toys to more dangerous objects such as fully functional handguns and assault rifles.

“So, what would be the best way to protect our intellectual property from someone else printing the same design using their own printer?” Jin asked. “We wanted to find something internal. What would be the inherent signatures printed by my own 3D printer instead of another 3D printer?”

3D printers build three-dimensional objects by adding successive layers of printing materials according to the digital design for a 3D model. Each 3D printer has an ‘extruder,’ which pushes the building material along. The extruder’s hot end then melts the material and places it on the print bed to build the model.

The researchers focused on this component as part of their study. This is because each extruder’s hot end has its own unique heating properties, which impact the precise construction of the 3D model. Such thermodynamic properties can identify the specific extruder and, thus, the model of a 3D printer, as unique as a human fingerprint, or what Jin has called a ‘ThermoTag’.

For the study, Jin compared the process to using a laptop to write a letter. Because software exists that can track keystrokes, an observer can see every step that went into the letter, including the writer’s unique writing style.

Similarly, because of the unique properties of each 3D printer’s extruder, a researcher can examine the specific manner in which a user has made a 3D-printed object, and compare that to a database of various extruders until they make a match. From there, once they identified the model printer, authorities could track down the purchaser of the said model if they had, for instance, used the printer to build an illegal assault rifle.

The News Highlights

  • ‘Fingerprint’ for 3D printers Can Aid In Protecting Intellectual property
  • Check the latest update on Gadgets news
Disclaimer: If you need to edit or update this news from compsmag then kindly contact us Learn more

For Latest News Follow us on Google News


Latest Headlines
  • Show all
  • Trending News
  • Popular By week
CNS Pharmaceuticals reports financial results for the first quarter of 2021 and provides business perspectives

CNS Pharmaceuticals reports financial results for the first quarter of 2021 and provides business perspectives

Commence patient enrollment in potentially pivotal study to evaluate efficacy of Berubicin in the treatment of adult GBM in Q2 2021; WPD Pharmaceuticals to ...
2021’s Best Sony PlayStation 4 Games

2021’s Best Sony PlayStation 4 Games

It’s 2021 and while the PlayStation 5 is the latest and greatest in gaming, it’s very hard to actually find one in stock. You might want to play Returnal on ...
DigitalAg4Her Hackathon launched by Berytech with Mashreq to boost agri-tech solutions

DigitalAg4Her Hackathon launched by Berytech with Mashreq to boost agri-tech solutions

The first edition of the DigitalAg4Her Hackathon is organised by Berytech, in collaboration with the World Bank Group’s Mashreq Gender Facility and ...
Masks are still needed at some Denver companies, despite Polis’ lifting order

Masks are still needed at some Denver companies, despite Polis’ lifting order

“Not only the tight space but also with how quick this is coming down, not knowing where the concern is with our customers, plus our staff,” said Elizabeth ...
USA in the news: CI Financial buys San Diego consulting firm

USA in the news: CI Financial buys San Diego consulting firm

Focus Financial Partners The financial terms were not disclosed. The partnership of wealth management firms has agreed to acquire Integer Wealth Advisors Group ...
Subscription Bank to attend Wells Fargo Securities Virtual Financial Services Investor Conference

Subscription Bank to attend Wells Fargo Securities Virtual Financial Services Investor Conference

The Bank has two wholly owned subsidiaries: Signature Financial LLC, provides equipment finance and leasing; and, Signature Securities Group Corporation, a ...
Adams seeks residents to serve on the Health Council, Parks Commission |  Adams

Adams seeks residents to serve on the Health Council, Parks Commission | Adams

Source “Do these boards need to be elected anymore?” Green asked. “Running for one of these positions is a barrier to engaging people in the public process. ...
Newsom proposes huge increase in funding for student mental health services

Newsom proposes huge increase in funding for student mental health services

Among other things, the funding includes $1 billion for a Children and Youth Behavioral Health Initiative that would help schools pair with community health ...
The least famous iconic video game boss may surprise you

The least famous iconic video game boss may surprise you

Source Maybe if a new “Punch-Out!!” sequel comes out, Tyson’s boxing prowess will be toned down a bit and fans won’t harbor so much resentment against ...
Show next
Compsmag - Latest News from tech, business and health
Logo