Marvin E. Robinson, Dallas civil rights and business leader, passes away at 86

Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht made a $1.2 million bid on the NFT play

“Marvin was one of the leaders of the college student sit-in movement,” claimed the Rev. Peter Johnson, another Dallas civil legal rights leader. “It’s a remarkable loss in the civil rights motion. … The technology of African American leaders in the civil legal rights movement is rapidly leaving this earth.”

Marvin E. Robinson, who arranged civil rights fights all through the South during the 1960s in front of beginning to be an advocate for Black business leadership and fairness in Dallas, has passed on at 86. Robinson died in his snooze Saturday at his Dallas dwelling. Born in Decatur, Alabama, Robinson experienced childhood in Gary, Indiana, and went to Southern University, Louisiana’s biggest historically black university, in Baton Rouge, as a track athlete. He was chosen leader of the student government, and in 1960 coordinated organize sit-ins at isolated meal counters and a march on the Louisiana State Capitol.

His sit-in sparked similar events in New Orleans, leading to a 1963 United States Supreme Court ruling that broke up restaurants in the state.

The protests had Robinson arrested for disturbing the peace and expelling him from college, 28 days before graduation.

Johnson, who was a teenager in Baton Rouge at the time, said his father helped raise funds to get Robinson and several other students out of prison.

“Marvin was a tremendous advocate for civil and equal rights,” said longtime friend Billy Allen. “You had absolutely no worries that Marvin wasn’t going to fight to give his best. He was going to represent the African American community to the best of his ability. “

After leaving Baton Rouge, Robinson attended Howard University Law School and was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which worked to organize civil rights protests in the South in the 1960s. He was also a field director for the Racial Equality Congress, where he continued to organize anti-segregation efforts in the Jim Crow South.

Johnson and Leah Robinson-Leach, Robinson’s daughter, said he also participated in the 1961 Freedom Rides, where integrated groups of students traveled by bus across the South to protest the separate bus stations.

“He would tell us about it, but at the end of the day he was just a dad,” said Robinson-Leach. Robinson received a law degree from Howard in 1968 and moved to Dallas a few years later, where he helped form networking groups for young black professionals in the city. He continued to use his leadership positions to fight systemic racism.

“He’s spent his entire life trying to bring equity and opportunity to people of color,” Allen said. “Marvin Robinson, to me, was a role model, a mentor.” In 1976, Robinson was commissioned to transform Dallas’ Crozier Technical High School into the city’s Magnet Business and Management High School, where he was the only black principal of such an institution. The students wore formal attire and were free to take regular coffee breaks, as they would in a corporate workplace.

Robinson later worked as an executive for the Xerox Corporation with a focus on improving the representation of minorities in the company. When he was a member of the Dallas Park board of directors in 1980, he led a campaign to disassociate a Dallas flower show from Fair Park due to all-white membership in local garden clubs. In 1983, he ran for a seat on the Dallas City Council, but lost in a runoff. A few years later, Robinson testified in a lawsuit regarding the council’s district voting system, claiming he was at a disadvantage as a candidate because of his race.

After leaving Xerox as vice president in 1985, he tried to start a Burger King franchise – but spoke out after no Dallas bank reportedly gave him an entrepreneurial loan despite his successful career at the company. . “The banks said I wasn’t qualified, but I was qualified to run Xerox,” Robinson said. The morning news from Dallas in 1988. “They do the same in country clubs.”

Robinson eventually opened the franchise and was president of a company that provided concessions to the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. Robinson-Leach said his father cares deeply for his family and enjoys traveling with his wife, Yvonne Metoyer Robinson, three children and six grandchildren. The family regularly took vacations to the Caribbean island of St. Martin and other international destinations. She said her dad had a great personality that made everyone feel like a close friend.

Disclaimer: If you need to edit or update this news from compsmag then kindly contact us Learn more

For Latest News Follow us on Google News


Latest Headlines
  • Show all
  • Trending News
  • Popular By week
BlackRock invents 'Blockchain and Tech' ETF Amid Cryptocurrency Collapse
BlackRock invents ‘Blockchain and Tech’ ETF Amid Cryptocurrency Collapse
Salim Ramji, the head of BlackRock’s global ETF business, said on a December episode of Bloomberg’s “Trillions” podcast that a thematic blockchain fund was ...
Verizon and T-Mobile compete in a 5G network test in New York, with new C-band release crashing into Sprint's airwaves
Verizon and T-Mobile compete in a 5G network test in New York, with new C-band release crashing into Sprint’s airwaves
One storied network analyst, Sascha Segan from PCMag, has managed to test the new C-band efforts of Verizon in New York, and came away unimpressed when ...
Lenovo Legion Y90 gaming phone leaked, so ROG Phone users beware!
Lenovo Legion Y90 gaming phone leaked, so ROG Phone users beware!
The Legion Y90 will come equipped with a hefty 5,500 mAh battery cell (probably dual-cell design, consisting of two 2,750 mAh batteries), and the phone will ...
Southern Japan quake breaks roads and buildings, NHK reports
Southern Japan quake breaks roads and buildings, NHK reports
The quake struck at 1:08am off Japan’s southern coast at a depth of 45 kilometers (28 miles), but there were no signs that it would trigger a a tsunami, ...
The World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a hotline for free COVID-19 testing
The World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a hotline for free COVID-19 testing
According to the White House, the tests will be sent out in late January, and White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Friday confirmed they will be “sent ...
Five ways the US housing market excelled in the past year
Five ways the US housing market excelled in the past year
Five standout facts from the 2021 housing market: The market for existing U.S. homes softened suddenly in December, yet 2021 still wrapped up with the most ...
The Fed may end up needing to actually sell some of its bonds
Peruvian groups agree to service deals with MMG mine after protests
The deal may bolster the Peru government’s claim that mining companies are starting to get on board with a new soft-handed approach to resolving social ...
COVID-19 causes staff shortages for Albertville Fire Department
COVID-19 causes staff shortages for Albertville Fire Department
Suggest a Correction Close Modal Suggest a Correction “It’s concerning,” Ennis said. “Our overtime budget has been hit hard. Of course, some of the ...
Carlyle prepares to raise its biggest ever European buyout fund
Carlyle prepares to raise its biggest ever European buyout fund
Washington, D.C.-based Carlyle hasn’t set a formal target for the new fund, and details could change, the people said. A representative for Carlyle declined ...
Yellen says Fed and Biden administration will take steps to contain inflation
Yellen still expects US inflation to return to 2% by the end of the year
“I expect inflation throughout much of the year — 12-month changes — to remain above 2%,” Yellen said Thursday in an interview with CNBC television. “But if ...
Show next
We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

Compsmag - Latest News In Tech and Business
Logo