We must work together to get out of this turmoil

We must work together to get out of this turmoil

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A malicious hacker attacked a critical US energy company because it failed to close the email account of a former employee. At a Florida water company, patching the defective old software that caused the supply disruption was a bad order.
These are just two examples of Nicole Perlroth, where small, seemingly innocuous gaps and accidents in a company’s IT network and management policy can be a far greater disaster, resulting in far beyond the territory of the company or company. Indicates that you are. Reach beyond the institution. When a hacker puts a digital foot on the door of a hyper-connected world, his ability to bring havoc to a much larger area becomes considerable-her book Perlroth is the winner of the Financial Times and McKinsey. The 2021 Business Book of the Year in the book “This Is How they Tell Me the World Ends”.
This book is a horrifying story about the dangers posed by inherently vulnerable IT systems at the heart of the rapidly expanding global cyber weapons competition. Reported by Pearl Ross as a cybersecurity reporter for the New York Times for 10 years from Silicon Valley, this vague world actor is no longer just a criminal or a lonely naughty hacker, but an increasingly national actor with apparently offensive intent. is.
The situation has only worsened since the book was completed earlier this year. In particular, the pandemic and associated home office migration and hybrid-style work have further expanded the opportunities for criminals and hostile state officials to abuse overloaded IT systems. “The attack surface has increased,” she says. Use the sharing tools that can be found from the share button above or next to the
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Hackers are in the midst of a wild and vague market where they share their knowledge of network and operating system gaps and weaknesses. A backdoor route to the smartphone operating system. For example, it sells for millions of dollars. Known as “zero-days,” these hacks grew from the surrounding area and became one of the main uses of malicious activity.
“This is a healthy market,” explains Perlroth. There is one important caveat. Participants never talk about it, as revealing knowledge about a vulnerability in an opponent’s system means that the target makes it worthless in order to fix it quickly.
The book begins with the arrival of Pearl Ross in Ukraine after Ukraine was the victim of an ongoing widespread cyberattack organized by Russia. Government agencies, transportation systems, ATMs, and utilities have been hit by what is called “Ground Zero for the most devastating cyberattacks the world has ever seen.”
But the important thing about Perlroth is that these events aren’t just about remote events. Rich, industrialized, highly networked and digitally dependent countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, are particularly vulnerable and poorly prepared. “There is no cavalry,” she said, and she added that she wrote a book because she “wants to awaken people.” The extent of the threat she saw is recorded in the title of the book. If there is no change, “We will face a catastrophic cyber-triggered event that will defeat us all, or we will be where we are now. It is death by a thousand reductions.” Use the sharing tools that can be found from the share button above or next to the
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Governments, businesses and individuals are part of the problem. State-led offensive cyber strategies are often based on blinding and then exploiting errors in a wide range of software programs. Organizations often see cybersecurity as a cost center that needs to be under tight control. Individuals usually feel that they are not playing a meaningful role in much larger conflicts. According to the
Pair Roth, it must change rapidly. In particular, the emergence of artificial intelligence only exacerbates the situation and is not irreversible. Policy makers need to be aware that future geopolitical conflicts “will occur as cyberwarfare or have strong cyber elements.” The winning country “will look like digital Israel,” she says. “A country that can continue its most basic services while surrounded by hostile activity.” She frankly does not have the United States and the United Kingdom in that state. “If we don’t strengthen our cyber defenses, we can’t win any more wars.”
Companies need to be more accountable. Directors need to ask the Chief Information Officer and security guards, “If you are involved in the next nation-state dispute, can you tolerate it or unknowingly be at the forefront of this dispute?” I have a goal as a company. You may think your data is safe. But if you don’t monitor what’s happening on your network, it could be used as a channel for nation-state espionage, “says Perlroth. “You have the lowest common denominator.”

In terms of what businesses can do, a number of necessary actions are fairly straightforward — and already known. These include educating employees not to click on attachments and links, providing training against phishing and other common hacking tactics, introducing two factor authentication and regular changing of passwords. In other words, as Perlroth, puts it: “All of the things we have been told time and time again we need to do but are annoying. We need to make them a priority.” But there is much more that needs to be done. This is why Perlroth herself has decided to leave journalism and join the US government on a two-year assignment as an adviser to a new cyber security agency at the Department of Homeland Security. The group brings together people from politics, public administration, the tech world and experts such as Perlroth. She believes that as a journalist in Silicon Valley she was well-placed to be a “connector” and “translator” between different worlds and actors that have often found it difficult to communicate and work with each other. “We have to work together — business and government — to hack our way out of this mess. That involves a level of collaboration and co-operation that we may never have seen in the west.”

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