TIVO BOLT UNIFIED REVIEW

By 412 scripted TV series originating on broadcast, cable, and online channels last year, viewers face the dual challenges of discovering shows that appeal to them and having sufficient waking hours to watch them. TiVo’s new digital video recorder, Bolt, indicate to help clarify both issues. An admitted TV addict, I bolted for a Bolt to see if it might rekindle the thrill I felt when TiVo debuted in 1999.
White and bent, Bolt is an unusual- looking part. Due to its hump, it must be topmost in a stack. Included in the box are an HDMI cable and a remote with two AA batteries (also white) that operate in both RF or IR modes (it defaults to RF with the guided setup). As a supplement, I extremely suggest the TiVo Slide Pro RF Remote ($50), and it is slide-out QWERTY keypad that’s used for organizing accounts and inputting search terms. Each remote work with Bolt’s Remote Finder function, which uses to activates an audible signal from a remote through the button on the rear panel.

Bolt is smaller than previous TiVo DVRs, partially a results of making the power supply outside and kill maximum legacy ports. A single RF input accommodates a coaxial cable or antenna for watching cable or over-the-air broadcasts, although you may have each source attached at the same time, as you would on previous models including two RF inputs.  One HDMI output is the only method to connect the picture to your A/V receiver or TV. Audio also could be output by way of an optical digital or one- pin stereo jack.

Bolt embeds Wi-Fi (AC Dual-band, N, G, B, A). However, I selected to plug into the Ethernet port (10/100/1,000 megabits per second). I put in a CableCARD by myself that had been provided by my cable service, Verizon FiOS. Together with the pair of USB 2.0 ports, it also has an eSATA port on the back panel that ought to appeal to video hoarders.

I powered on Bolt and went by way of the prompts for activating TiVo service also downloading cable system’s program guide. Within 30 minutes, I was establishing OnePass recordings for series I often watch. You may decide to include reruns, episodes which might be new, or ones streamed from online services.

The TiVo app

My Verizon FiOS app had been okay. When it worked, I was able to record shows remotely and verify what was in my queue. Apart from that, I used it to pay my bill. The TiVo app for iPhone is phenomenal.

It may simply be used as a remote to your TiVo, and you’ll access and watch anything you’ve recorded out of your iPhone so much time as you’re connected to the same wifi that your TiVo is related to. As soon as watching on your iPhone you may then use Apple’s AirPlay to stream what you’re watching on a different TV in your home that has an AppleTV. Moreover, you had the plan to watch something that’s at the moment on the air, with one tap you can do this and TiVo will begin recording it so you may access it from your device.


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Specifications

  • Optical audio out
  • Analog Audio
  • HDMI – 4K UHD, 1080p (24/60)
  • External storage port (eSATA)
  • 150 HD hours Recording capacity
  • 1000 GB Hard drive size
  • Video output – 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p, 4K UHD
  • 12V Power
  • Ethernet port (10/100/1000 Mbps) – 10/100/1000 Mbps
  • Coax connector
  • Two USB 2.0 ports
  • CableCARD slot
  • Built-in WiFi (AC Dual-band, N, G, B, A)

Highlights

  • Unified Entertainment System that may only compete with cable boxes and gaming programs
  • Works in conjunction with present cable provider
  • Contains model new features similar to ‘SkipMode’ and ‘QuickMode.’
  • Consists of built-in WiFi, expandable storage, and a very helpful RF distant
  • Features 4K Ultra High Definition resolution

VERDICT

With Bolt (and to some extent with the earlier Roamio model), Tivo attempted to build a “unified entertainment system” which is both the DVR and streaming device in one. Probably, this implies you may own one less device, you can search throughout recordings/guide data/streaming providers, and also you don’t have to change to an entirely different TV enter for streaming. That is an excellent concept that ought to be applauded. Sadly, Tivo hasn’t nailed it (but). The DVR facet of the product is best-in-class: It’s insanely good. The “wishlist” performance has been catching and recording a great deal of high-quality content which we didn’t even know was on/available. This is huge for cord cutters who traditionally can’t discover a lot valuable OTA content (it may be there, you just don’t understand it). However, most people will not be satisfied with the current state of the streaming apps (providing gaps, bugs). Most people will still need/want a better streamer (Roku, AppleTV, and so on.). With that consideration in mind is the Bolt price $299-$399 upfront, and then $150/year (after the first year) for distinctive DVR performance? “Yes,” in case you can afford the price tag.


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Compsmag