Why con name folder cannot be created

“Con” is likely one of the several reserved names that you couldn’t use. These names date back to the days of DOS, and the reason you possibly can’t use them is which have particular meanings. It’s by design and hard coded into the OS since DOS. You can’t make folders on the desktop which have “System Action” or “Device” references similar to the con, nul and prn. The Solution is to make use of one other title or use 0 as an alternative of o, O for C0n.

Listed below others:

CON, PRN, AUX, NUL, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9, CLOCK$, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, LPT9

All of it begins with the old PIP CP/M command – this command, used to copy files, and allowed you to specify special device names instead of files.

CON: — console (input and output)
AUX: — an auxiliary device. In CP/M 1 and 2, PIP used PUN: (paper tape punch) and RDR: (paper tape reader) instead of AUX:
LST: — list output device, usually the printer
PRN: — as LST:, but lines were numbered, tabs expanded and form feeds added every 60 lines
NUL: — null device, akin to /dev/null
EOF: — input device that produced end-of-file characters, ASCII 0x1A
INP: — custom input device, by default the same as EOF:
OUT: — custom output device, by default the same as NUL:

//Read Also: How to Create a CON Folder in Windows

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